Welcome to the Health in Humanitarian Crises Centre


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Humanitarian crises due to armed conflict, natural disasters, disease outbreaks and other hazards are a major and growing

contributor to ill-health and vulnerability worldwide. The persisting effects of crises on health and health systems can undermine decades of social development.

Humanitarian crises also present a number of distinct challenges for public health intervention and research. These include: violence and insecurity; mass population displacement; severely deteriorated daily living conditions and impoverishment; the sudden and widespread disruption of health services and the broader health system, including of health surveillance; and reduced domestic availability of human, financial and technical resources alongside increased need to coordinate aid from outside.

Despite these challenges, many staff and students from across the School are actively engaged in public health research in crisis-affected contexts.

How can we improve the public health response in humanitarian crises?

Adequate, high quality, evidence is lacking to inform humanitarian response teams to ensure they deliver effective interventions. This gap was identified through a 2015 evidence review of research on health interventions in humanitarian crises, authored by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine (LSHTM) and commissioned by ELHRA’s Research for Health in Humanitarian Crises Programme (R2HC).

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Free online course on Health in Humanitarian Crises

We have developed an exciting three-week long online course where you will hear from experts at LSHTM and beyond what the critical issues related to health needs and the delivery of health interventions are in humanitarian crises. The course will start on February 6th 2017. Come and enrol now!

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Introduction to the newly launched UK Public Health Rapid Support Team

The UK Government has provided funding for the establishment of the UK Public Health Rapid Support Team (RST), which will be jointly run on Thursday 15th December at 17.30 by Public Health England and the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, with academic partners at the University of Oxford and Kings College London.

Register here